The Dangers of Leadership Ghosting

The Dangers of Leadership Ghosting

Over the last few months, I have been hearing the term “Ghosting”.

What does Ghosting mean?

According to Wikipedia-Ghosting definition means:

Ghosting is breaking off a relationship by ceasing all communication and contact with the former partner without any apparent warning or justification, as well as avoiding or ignoring and refusing to respond to the former partner’s attempts to reach out or communicate.
What is Leadership Ghosting?
Here is my definition:
A leader who ceases to properly communicate, is unavailable, refuses or ignores to respond to questions or suggestions, but thinks he/she knows what is happening within the business.  They make decisions that are bad or unreasonable and are disengaged from staff.  They run the business through emails or texts. Misunderstandings occur due to lack of face to face contact or verbal conversation for details and guidance.  The Ghosting Leaders make decisions without knowing the full scope of the situation or ask questions and these decisions are harmful to the organizations, the bottom line and the staff become very resentful due to the cause and effects of these decisions, as well as the lack of input.
Behavior of Leadership Ghosting:
  • A ghosting leader withdrawals communication with staff
  • Ignore employees
  • Fears conflict
  • Fears disappointing someone or looking like the “bad person”
  • Doesn’t want to deal with someone’s anger

These type of leaders don’t like to deal with uncomfortable situations.  Instead of addressing the circumstance they avoid the situation altogether.

Examples of Ghosting:

  • Your boss said you would get a promotion and months later nothing
  • You apply for a position and go through the interview and weeks go by and you find out someone else got the position.  The ghost leader didn’t tell you
  • You’re promised information by a certain day and time and never receive it

The dangers of Leadership Ghosting leaves employees feeling undervalued, disregarded and disappointed.  This type of leadership style is unprofessional, rude and cruel.

 

If you recognize ghosting leaders in your organization or within yourself.  Here are a few tips to encourage behavioral change in this leadership style.

  • Sit down with them and discuss the behavior you have observe
  • Ask questions, give feedback on their management style and suggestions on how to improve engagement with staff
  • Schedule leadership training courses – Udemy.com or Lynda.com
  • Schedule interpersonal communication courses – Udemy.com or Lynda.com
  • Schedule conflict resolution courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule constructive criticism courses – Udemy.com
  • Get them a mentor who is a successful leader
  • Hire a leadership coach to help them succeed
  • Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

Takeaway:

Overcoming the fear of conflict will reduce anxiety, strengthen courage and promotes better communication skills.  Start by responding back to emails, voicemails and texts even if it is short and to the point.  Something is better than nothing.  Meet with employees, listen and be engaged.  As you address difficult situations it does get easier as time goes on.

Have you experienced Leadership Ghosting?  

If yes, What was it like?

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

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