Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Career Inspiration, Leadership Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Polls

Don’t Be That (Guy) Person!

Lately, I have been hearing this phrase when people are talking about their coworkers.

Don’t be that guy! 

Employers and staff may use this term when someone has committed bad behavior or done something procedurally wrong.  In some organizations, they use this term “Don’t be that (Guy) Person” for humiliation or an example of what not to do. The poster child of what not to be in the workplace.

Is shaming an effective management strategy? 

Some say yes because it represents what not to do in the workplace and halts people from doing it.

How does “Don’t be that Person” cope with being the scapegoat?

Some quit some stay and deal with the whispering behind their backs and the harsh judgment while others checkout (isolate themselves).

Maybe some organizations want this type of shaming to keep things under control.  If so, something is wrong.  Someone once told me you live in a fantasy world if you think this type of management strategy will change. 

What do you think?


Comments are welcome. What are your thoughts on this topic?

For more information about Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Career Inspiration, Inspirational Moments, Leadership Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Polls

Tips on How to Reverse Rude Behavior in Meetings

As a leader having efficient and effective meetings are so important to every aspect of running a successful business.  Meetings that aren’t productive are a waste of valuable time and cost the company money.

Have you ever been in a meeting and there is at least one person or all attendees that have nothing positive to say about anything?

I remember one day I finally snapped in a meeting.  My leader wasn’t listening and was talking over of me, while I was trying to explain why my team needed some technical help.  So I started raising my voice over my leader.  I was so upset with myself.  That day I came to realize this isn’t for me and I didn’t like being push to respond that way.  I knew that this was the norm for the group, always trying to one-up, and I didn’t want to play anymore.  I started putting my exit plan into action, it was time for me to remove myself from working there.

What are rude behaviors in meetings?

  • Interrupting the person speaking
  • Not listening, acting bored or lack of engagement
  • Being disrespectful to the speaker
  • Two people talking privately among themselves while someone else is speaking
  • People are just plain hostile to each other
  • Arguing over whose point is right
  • Over talking each other
  • Sarcastic mean comments to the speaker or each other
  • Being very judgmental to each other
  • One-upping each other
  • Participants taking everything that is said very personally due to the hostile interaction
  • Embarrassing the host or leader with malicious remarks

I have been in group meetings where all of these actions have happened, been the target, and been a participant of some of these disrespectful behaviors.  I am not proud about the way I acted, discourteous and unprofessional at times, but that was acceptable to be heard.  Was this behavior a way to conquer and get what was needed?  Not really.  Did anything get resolved?  Most of the time nothing was accomplished.

What lesson did I learn?  I wanted things to be different and I probably cared too much.  I was tired, beaten down, disrespected, and unhappy with the results.  I knew that nothing was going to change in these meetings and I had to either accept it, change my thinking or leave.

On the bright side my team at the time had a code of conduct for our meetings.  People were respectful to each other and follow them.  If someone didn’t follow the code of conduct including me, the team would call you out on it.  Things got resolved and people felt heard.

What happened to common courtesy, collaboration and respectfulness towards each other?

How can we change the behavior?  I believe it takes one person at a time, and the leader to lead by example and reverse this unprofessional behavior.

Here are some tips:

  • Set up rules of conduct for meeting(s).  Go over them at the beginning of each meeting as a reminder.  Have the code of conduct on the agenda template.  As time goes on with the same group of attendees, the code of conduct will not have to be quoted every time, because it is on the agenda.  I would recommend that if you have a new person attending the meeting to read the code of conduct at the beginning of the meeting.
  • When someone says something negative, turn to them and say something positive about the topic or person.
  • When someone intentionally breaks meeting etiquette, politely remind them or refer to the code of conduct.
  • As the leader focus on following the code of conduct, leading by example, and positive meeting etiquette will become achievable by all participants.
  • Redirect the “off topic” discussions to be addressed later.

Takeaway:

Having a set code of conduct and behavior etiquette is so important to running successful meetings.  Being courteous and respectful allows everyone to speak, to be heard, participate, engage and this is when great results will happen. Be organized and prepared.  As a leader, we lead by example and if we are not focused and engaged; our employees will not be either.  ~ Patti

Comments are always welcome.  You can always use your initials or anonymous for your name, if this makes you feel more comfortable to respond.  🙂   Did you find this helpful?  If so, please share this blog post with your colleagues, friends, and family on all your social networks!  Thank you. 🙂

For more information about Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

Are you interested in one to one coaching with me?  I have coaching packages available.  Contact me at patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Career Inspiration, Leadership Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Polls

When There Isn’t Enough and Emotions Get in the Way

In today’s blog post I am going to tell a story about getting upset over a situation which may sound ridiculous.

Recently, I was at the bowling alley.  I get to the bowling alley pretty early to reserve a table and chairs for my team. Tables are precious commodity because there are not enough tables for all the bowling teams.  If you don’t get a table your team has to sit down on the lanes or stand up all night.

Past experience:

I’ve had people actually move my stuff off the table or take chairs if I walked away.  Now, when I get a table I feel I can’t even walk away until one of my bowling team members comes and sits down.

Usually, I am pretty easy-going and don’t confront people on their rude behaviors.  But this particular day I had enough and said something.

My version of what happened:

This guy (I will call him Fred) from another bowling team grabbed one of the chairs at my table and move it so his daughter could sit down and Fred put her right in front of our table.  He didn’t say anything to me just grabbed the chair.  If Fred had asked me I would have said sure she can have the chair and go get another chair.

Here are the thoughts that were going in my head:

I get there an hour and a half early to reserve the table and chairs and Fred walks in 15 minutes before bowling starts and acts like he owns the place.

So I said to Fred you need to get me another chair.  He said ma’am you are being rude just take another chair from the table next to you.  Then one of his team members says to me “you already have 6 chairs”.  I had 5 chairs for the 5 team members on my team.  I wasn’t going to take one from another reserved table.

Then Fred commanded his daughter to grab a chair from the table next to me which another team had been saving almost as long as me.   His daughter didn’t want to do it.  But Fred insisted and she did.

I was so angry.  Usually, I wouldn’t have been mad or even said anything but his attitude and arrogance reeked of “I don’t care” and “I am going to do what I want”.  No consideration at all to others.

So I told (Chuck, not real name) on another team what happened and Fred said “quit talking behind my back the chair was for my daughter”.  This made Chuck very uncomfortable, he got up and said I don’t know what to tell you, talk to the league secretary.  Later, I found out Fred and Chuck are sort of friends.  (Awkward!).  The reason I told Chuck is because he was there early just like me and has had similar things happen with his tables.

Feeling embarrassed and betrayed I did a group text to my bowling team about the chair incident.  This foolish chair escapade had me upset all night, needless to say I didn’t bowl good, however Fred did.

At the end of the bowling night one of my team members (Seth, not real name) went and spoke with Fred.  Fred told Seth that he had a rough day and he was just getting the chair for his daughter.  Seth said to Fred if you asked her she would have gladly given you the chair.

Why do we get so upset over the little things and continue not to let it go?

Yes, I should have probably handled the situation in a totally different way but I didn’t.  Yes, I probably shouldn’t have gotten other people involved, but I did.

Was it ridiculous to get upset over a chair?

Maybe, however the small things will continue to add up into bigger things when the issue is not resolved.

Takeaway:

We all make choices whether good or bad throughout life.  Each day is a learning lesson.  Sometimes not saying anything is the best result.  Maybe the less we respond to rude people, the less drama we create in our lives.  Here is a good reminder. You may never know what someone else is going through and just maybe they’re having a really bad day.  Be kind anyways. ~ Patti 🦋

🦋 My question for you 🦋

 How would you have handled this situation?

 

Comments are always welcome.  

Please share this blog post with your colleagues, friends, and family on all your social networks! 

Are you interested in one to one coaching with me?  I have coaching packages available.  Contact me at patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

Do you want better relationships? If yes, come hang out with Angela Ambrosia, Love & Relationship coach and me while listening to all of our podcast adventures called Building Better Relationships at Home and Work with Angela & Patti Podcast

Want even more tips about creating better relationships? Come join our Facebook group called Building Better Relationships at Home and Work with Angela & Patti Facebook Group

 

Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Career Inspiration, Inspirational Moments, Leadership Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Podcasts, Polls

Building Better Relationships [Podcast] – Episode 6 – How’s Your Love Life Competing With Your Phone?

Episode 6 podcast – How’s Your Love Life Competing With Your Phone?   In this podcast Patti and Angela discuss how the cell phone can enhance and limit relationships with others.  They also talk about their personal relationships with their own phones. 

Click here to listen – How’s Your Love Life With Your Phone? 

Take the poll and then listen to Patti and Angela answer to this question.  You may be surprised!

Here’s the quote Patti read in the podcast:

Please share this podcast with others, push the like button on Anchor and leave us an encouraging review.

Discover Patti’s new online course:  INCREDIBLE WORK-LIFE BALANCE HACKS for BUSY LEADERS
This course is for leaders who are crazy busy, works 24/7 and wants something more in their life.  The course has 7 hacks to create some balance in this so called busy life! coaching-for-inspiration-with-patti.teachable.com/

Check out the ENERGY BODY OF SELF ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM 

Put Your Relationship with yourself as a priority and discover a simple energy system with movement and exercises that empower you to accept yourself, overcome old habits and discover what love is that allows self acceptance to happen effortlessly. https://bit.ly/2BMG79s

Read Angela’s blog post Turn OFF Your Phone and Get Turned ON 

Angela and I would like to thank our sponsor Brandless for supporting our podcast.  To learn more about Brandless click here on the link.

Want even more relationships tips? Come join our Facebook group called Building Better Relationships at Home and Work with Angela & Patti Facebook Group

Are you interested in coaching with Patti?  I have coaching packages available.  Contact me at patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

Become a monthly supporter of Building Better Relationships at Home and Work with Angela and Patti a podcast. Click on the support button in the Anchor App. “By supporting Building Better Relationships at Home and Work with Angela and Patti podcasts through donations this will help sustain future episodes. Thank you for listening and sharing. 🙂 ”

Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Career Inspiration, Leadership Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Polls

The Draining of Leadership Vampires

The Draining of Leadership Vampires

This is a bonus post of the Bad Leadership series.  I was talking to one of my coaching friend’s Plynn Gutman about the Bad Leadership blog series.  She said to me, you have to do an extra one on Leadership Vampires who steal employees successes and claim them as their own.  In other words, does not give credit where credit is due.  This blog post is for you Plynn and thank you for the suggestion.

How does it feel when your boss takes credit for your work?  Not good at all. People don’t feel satisfied or appreciated when they are not acknowledge for their contributions.  This happens and is a common practice within some organizations.

How do you handle this when it happens?  (Pause and Reflect)

What is the organization culture?  

Do they recognize people ideas or suggestions?  

This will make a huge difference on how to react.  Is it acceptable to stand up and take credit for your ideas.  Will your direct supervisor support you when you do?  Is it worth standing up and saying look at me?

I believe, yes, everyone should be recognized for their contributions. However, some managers don’t give credit where credit is due.  Remember to pick your battles carefully especially when you work for Vampire Leaders.

Ask yourself:

Do I want to announce to everyone, hey, this was my idea?  

If yes, (Stop, Pause and Reflect) – Will this halt any future career opportunities for me?

If no, schedule time to meet with your boss privately to discuss it.

When I think of Leadership Vampires, it is a Boss that sucks the life right out of you.  They are harsh, aggressive, demanding and belittling.  They show favoritism and leave you feeling beat down mentally and physically.  When around them you may feel anxious, sick, angry or depressed.  They have a habit of reprimanding staff in front of others and micro-managing employees time.  They lack empathy and drain the positivity and creativity right out of you.

How do you deal with this type of Leadership?

  • Don’t react
  • Be calm
  • Listen patiently
  • Don’t interrupt
  • Don’t disagree
  • Pick your battles wisely
  • Apologize when necessary
  • Give them nothing to feed on. They love drama!

Take away:

Working for a Vampire leader is exhausting.  Keep calm and don’t react to the harshness.  Work hard and listen carefully.  Say your daily positive affirmations throughout the day to keep yourself going. You got this!

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

For more information about Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Career Inspiration, Leadership Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Polls

The Dangers of Leadership Ghosting

The Dangers of Leadership Ghosting

Over the last few months, I have been hearing the term “Ghosting”.

What does Ghosting mean?

According to Wikipedia-Ghosting definition means:

Ghosting is breaking off a relationship by ceasing all communication and contact with the former partner without any apparent warning or justification, as well as avoiding or ignoring and refusing to respond to the former partner’s attempts to reach out or communicate.
 
What is Leadership Ghosting?
 
Here is my definition:
 
A leader who ceases to properly communicate, is unavailable, refuses or ignores to respond to questions or suggestions, but thinks he/she knows what is happening within the business.  They make decisions that are bad or unreasonable and are disengaged from staff.  They run the business through emails or texts. Misunderstandings occur due to lack of face to face contact or verbal conversation for details and guidance.  The Ghosting Leaders make decisions without knowing the full scope of the situation or ask questions and these decisions are harmful to the organizations, the bottom line and the staff become very resentful due to the cause and effects of these decisions, as well as the lack of input.
 
 
Behavior of Leadership Ghosting:
  • A ghosting leader withdrawals communication with staff
  • Ignore employees
  • Fears conflict
  • Fears disappointing someone or looking like the “bad person”
  • Doesn’t want to deal with someone’s anger

These type of leaders don’t like to deal with uncomfortable situations.  Instead of addressing the circumstance they avoid the situation altogether.

Examples of Ghosting:

  • Your boss said you would get a promotion and months later nothing
  • You apply for a position and go through the interview and weeks go by and you find out someone else got the position.  The ghost leader didn’t tell you
  • You’re promised information by a certain day and time and never receive it

The dangers of Leadership Ghosting leaves employees feeling undervalued, disregarded and disappointed.  This type of leadership style is unprofessional, rude and cruel.

 

If you recognize ghosting leaders in your organization or within yourself.  Here are a few tips to encourage behavioral change in this leadership style.

  • Sit down with them and discuss the behavior you have observe
  • Ask questions, give feedback on their management style and suggestions on how to improve engagement with staff
  • Schedule leadership training courses – Udemy.com or Lynda.com
  • Schedule interpersonal communication courses – Udemy.com or Lynda.com
  • Schedule conflict resolution courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule constructive criticism courses – Udemy.com
  • Get them a mentor who is a successful leader
  • Hire a leadership coach to help them succeed
  • Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

Takeaway:

Overcoming the fear of conflict will reduce anxiety, strengthen courage and promotes better communication skills.  Start by responding back to emails, voicemails and texts even if it is short and to the point.  Something is better than nothing.  Meet with employees, listen and be engaged.  As you address difficult situations it does get easier as time goes on.

Have you experienced Leadership Ghosting?  

If yes, What was it like?

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

 
How to Deal with Being Ghosted!
Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Career Inspiration, Leadership Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Polls

The Signs of a Workplace Bully Leader

The Signs of a Workplace Bully Leader

Bullying in the workplace has become a major topic in today’s world of leadership.  Many of us have actually experienced workplace bullying during sometime in our careers.

Today, I am going to discuss the warning signs of a Workplace Bully Leaders to increase awareness.

What is Workplace Bullying?

According to Wikipedia  Workplace bullying is a persistent pattern of mistreatment from others in the workplace that causes either physical or emotional harm.  It can include such tactics as verbalnonverbalpsychologicalphysical abuse and humiliation. This type of workplace aggression is particularly difficult because, unlike the typical school bully, workplace bullies often operate within the established rules and policies of their organization and their society. In the majority of cases, bullying in the workplace is reported as having been by someone who has authority over their victim. However, bullies can also be peers, and occasionally subordinates. 

Signs of a Possible Workplace Bully Leaders:

  • Demeaning, disrespectful and devaluing employees capabilities
  • Public ridicule, sarcastic, insults, name-calling, threats, and intimidation
  • Targeting and creating social isolation with staff
  • Blaming, lying, gossiping, spreading rumors and whispering
  • Failing to give credit to employees for their work
  • Overloading targeted employee with a huge workload
  • Micro-Manages and commands respect without earning it
  • A know it all

Bully leaders create isolation and silo work environments.  They divide staff and departments to keep control.

Why don’t people speak up?  Employees are afraid of losing their jobs.

Bullying by leadership has been associated with number of physical and behavioral health issues for the employees who are targeted.

Warning Signs of an Employee Being Bullied:

  • Becomes less socially active or confident
  • Appears scared, stressed, anxious or depressed
  • Calling out sick more frequently than normal
  • Physical signs of tension such as headaches, backaches, not sleeping well and suicidal thoughts

If bullying is unaddressed the aggression and unresolved conflicts will continue to escalate.  When not dealt with, it causes negative affects on the targeted workers – maybe even psychological, financial and physical burdens.

The Results to the Employers: 

  • High Turnover and Absenteeism
  • Low Productivity
  • Lack of Creativity
  • Legal Costs
  • Damaged Reputation

If you recognize Workplace Bully Leaders in your organization or within yourself.

Here are a few tips to encourage behavioral change for this type of leadership style.

  • Sit down with them and discuss the behavior you have observe
  • Ask questions, give feedback on their management style and suggestions on how to improve engagement with staff
  • Set a zero tolerance approach of workplace bullying
  • Build trust and open door policies to discuss bullying
  • Schedule leadership training courses especially on bullying – Udemy.com
  • Schedule emotional intelligent courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule interpersonal communication courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule conflict resolution courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule constructive criticism courses – Udemy.com
  • Read John C. Maxwell Relationships 101 book
  • Get them a mentor who is a successful leader
  • Hire a leadership coach to help them succeed
  • Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

Takeaway:

Bullying promotes an atmosphere of fear, vulnerability, anxiousness, and uncertainty.  Awareness is the key to change.  Develop a workplace of zero tolerance accompanied with training, coaching and mentoring to display compassion, empathy, safety and trust.

Have you had a Workplace Bully as a Boss?  

If yes, How did they make you feel?  

How did you overcome it?

Answering these questions above and sharing your experiences may help someone else dealing with a workplace bully.

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Career Inspiration, Leadership Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Polls

The Hazardous Results of the Inflexible Leader

The Hazardous Results of the Inflexible Leader

Today, I am going to discuss the leadership style of an inflexible boss.  These type of personalities are unapproachable at work and home.  Any type of change is not welcome or encouraged.  Working with this type of leader stifles innovation and creativity while leaving employees feeling resentful and unmotivated.

What is an inflexible leader?

The inflexible boss is arrogant, distant, unreasonable and unapproachable.  They are closed minded to any changes and will not listen to any new ideas, consider different options or new technology.   The inflexible boss promotes fear over staff to ensure they follow their ways of doing things.

Characteristics of this type to leadership style:

  • Punishes for not doing things their way
  • Their way or the highway
  • Don’t listen or open to any suggestions
  • Always right
  • Strictly by the book/procedures
  • Favorite phrase – We’ve always done it this way
  • Never says sorry
  • Lacks empathy
  • Jumps to conclusion before gathering all the facts

If you recognize inflexible leaders in your organization or within yourself.  Here are a few tips to encourage behavioral change in this leadership style.

  • Sit down with them and discuss the behavior you have observed and explain that it is important to be open to new ways this helps the company to succeed
  • Ask questions, give feedback on their management style and suggestions on how to improve engagement with staff
  • Schedule change management courses – Udemy.com or Lynda.com
  • Schedule emotional intelligence courses Udemy.com
  • Schedule leadership training courses – Lynda.com
  • Schedule interpersonal communication courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule conflict resolution courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule constructive criticism courses – Udemy.com
  • Give them a mentor who is a successful leader
  • Hire a leadership coach to help them succeed like me
  • Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

Takeaway:

A good leader will let employees try new and different ways of doing processes, especially if the current approach isn’t working or becoming mundane.  Listening is essential to know what is working and what is not.  Being approachable and welcoming is the first step to building trust and be able to hear what people are feeling and new ideas.

If yes, How did you feel working for them?

What were the obstacles and how did you deal with it?

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Career Inspiration, Leadership Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Polls

The Destruction of the Absentee Leader


What is an absentee leader?

An absentee leader is someone in a leadership position who is psychologically absent from their responsibilities as a leader.  They are known as the “silent killers.”

Here are some characteristics of an absentee leader:

  • Psychologically absent from their staff.
  • Take value out of an organization without contributing back.
  • These leaders are laissez-faire (to let people do as they choose)
  • Don’t show up to meetings, unresponsive to emails, gives zero feedback and doesn’t share important information with employees.
  • Seldom engage with staff.

Organizations rarely confront the absentee leaders.  If left unobserved they can halt succession planning, block potential staff from promoting and cause unproductively in the workplace.  Those who report to them may become frustrated which has a negative impact on the employees and the work environment.

Teams with absent supervisors often feel they have no direction, are unrecognized, neglected and overlooked without any clear goals, guidance, and feedback.  Employees don’t develop under an absentee leader.

The Destruction of the Absentee Leader:

  • Degrades the employee’s job satisfaction
  • Leads to job performance uncertainty
  • Employee’s stress levels and talents are drained

As long as the absentee leader has an employee who will pick up the slack this behavior will continue.  The absentee leader enjoys the perks and entitlements of their title but isn’t doing the job.  This type of leadership style is destructive. The hard-working employee’s who are actually doing the work aren’t receiving the support, recognition, or crucial feedback.  The absentee leader accepts credit when things are going right and pushes blame on staff when things are not.

If you recognize an absentee leader in your organization or within yourself. Here are a few tips to encourage behavioral change in this leadership style.

Companies don’t always see the effects of this type of leadership style until the damage has already occurred.

Takeaway:

Recognize the absentee leader within your organization or inside yourself and address the situation.  Employees want a leader who is there for them.  Staff follow a leader who will coach, train, motivate, recognize their accomplishments and help them to succeed.

Have you experienced an absentee leader?  If yes, What was it like?

 

 

 

 

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

Posted in Blog, Business Inspiration, Personal Inspiration, Polls

Fidget Spinners the New Craze – Why?

Fidget spinners are everywhere.  Have you seen one?  If the answer is no, maybe you didn’t know what it was.  It is the new craze with children and adults.

What is a Fidget spinner?  According to Wikipedia below here is the definition of a Fidget Spinner: 

fidget spinner is a toy that consists of a ball-bearing in the center of a multi-lobed flat structure made from metal or plastic designed to spin along its axis with little effort.

Fidget spinners became popular toys in April 2017, although similar devices had been invented as early as 1993. The popularity of the toy among children and teenagers has led some schools to ban use of the spinners in class for being a distraction, while other schools have allowed the toy to be used discreetly.

The toy has been advertised as helping people who have trouble with focusing or fidgeting  by relieving nervous energy or psychological stress. There are claims that a fidget spinner can be used to help calm people down who suffer from anxiety and other neurological disorders like ADHD and autism.  However, as of May 2017, there is no scientific evidence that they are effective as a treatment for autism or ADHD. ~ Wikipedia

In this video below is a demonstration of a fidget spinner which Allen Blau a friend of mine made from an old skate board.  He removed the bearings and glued them together so it would be balanced.   Allen says it doesn’t spin like all the fancy ones, but the weight and size is perfect for him.

 

There is talk that the fidget spinner helps the brain focus and reduces stress.  This produces a calming visual simulation and some even compare the fidget spinners to stress balls to relieve high intense stress levels in the workplace.

Recently schools have started to ban fidget spinners saying they are a distraction and disruption in the classrooms for the students and teachers.

What about the workplace?  Are fidget spinners a distraction similar to having personal cell phones in the work area?  I am all for reducing stress and burn-out in the workplace, however if it is a constant distraction and taking away from work performance then guidelines need to be established on what is acceptable and was is not.

Do I know for sure if fidget spinners really reduce stress and anxiety?  No I do not, however some individuals say it does reduce their stress and anxiety.  Scientific researchers are still gathering data on this subject.  Will this craze end before the research is gathered?  Only time will tell.

 

 

 

Take Away:

Here are my thoughts, if an individual benefits from a fidget spinner and it helps their brain focus and they are less stressed-out; what does taking a few minutes out of the day hurt?  Now, we all know there are going to be people who abuse everything, that is their nature, however why should one person ruin it for everyone else.  Accountability is the key, if you abuse something, it will be taken away; and boundaries need to be set and followed.  Enjoy life with less stress, however don’t be the one, with lack of restraint and spoil it for others. ~ Patti

To learn more about a stress free life; sign up and click on the link 21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop.

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, family and on your social networks for others to get inspired!

To learn more about one to one coaching with Patti – email me at: patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com