The Dangers of Leadership Ghosting

The Dangers of Leadership Ghosting

Over the last few months, I have been hearing the term “Ghosting”.

What does Ghosting mean?

According to Wikipedia-Ghosting definition means:

Ghosting is breaking off a relationship by ceasing all communication and contact with the former partner without any apparent warning or justification, as well as avoiding or ignoring and refusing to respond to the former partner’s attempts to reach out or communicate.
What is Leadership Ghosting?
Here is my definition:
A leader who ceases to properly communicate, is unavailable, refuses or ignores to respond to questions or suggestions, but thinks he/she knows what is happening within the business.  They make decisions that are bad or unreasonable and are disengaged from staff.  They run the business through emails or texts. Misunderstandings occur due to lack of face to face contact or verbal conversation for details and guidance.  The Ghosting Leaders make decisions without knowing the full scope of the situation or ask questions and these decisions are harmful to the organizations, the bottom line and the staff become very resentful due to the cause and effects of these decisions, as well as the lack of input.
Behavior of Leadership Ghosting:
  • A ghosting leader withdrawals communication with staff
  • Ignore employees
  • Fears conflict
  • Fears disappointing someone or looking like the “bad person”
  • Doesn’t want to deal with someone’s anger

These type of leaders don’t like to deal with uncomfortable situations.  Instead of addressing the circumstance they avoid the situation altogether.

Examples of Ghosting:

  • Your boss said you would get a promotion and months later nothing
  • You apply for a position and go through the interview and weeks go by and you find out someone else got the position.  The ghost leader didn’t tell you
  • You’re promised information by a certain day and time and never receive it

The dangers of Leadership Ghosting leaves employees feeling undervalued, disregarded and disappointed.  This type of leadership style is unprofessional, rude and cruel.

 

If you recognize ghosting leaders in your organization or within yourself.  Here are a few tips to encourage behavioral change in this leadership style.

  • Sit down with them and discuss the behavior you have observe
  • Ask questions, give feedback on their management style and suggestions on how to improve engagement with staff
  • Schedule leadership training courses – Udemy.com or Lynda.com
  • Schedule interpersonal communication courses – Udemy.com or Lynda.com
  • Schedule conflict resolution courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule constructive criticism courses – Udemy.com
  • Get them a mentor who is a successful leader
  • Hire a leadership coach to help them succeed
  • Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

Takeaway:

Overcoming the fear of conflict will reduce anxiety, strengthen courage and promotes better communication skills.  Start by responding back to emails, voicemails and texts even if it is short and to the point.  Something is better than nothing.  Meet with employees, listen and be engaged.  As you address difficult situations it does get easier as time goes on.

Have you experienced Leadership Ghosting?  

If yes, What was it like?

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

The Signs of a Workplace Bully Leader

The Signs of a Workplace Bully Leader

Bullying in the workplace has become a major topic in today’s world of leadership.  Many of us have actually experienced workplace bullying during sometime in our careers.

Today, I am going to discuss the warning signs of a Workplace Bully Leaders to increase awareness.

What is Workplace Bullying?

According to Wikipedia  Workplace bullying is a persistent pattern of mistreatment from others in the workplace that causes either physical or emotional harm.  It can include such tactics as verbalnonverbalpsychologicalphysical abuse and humiliation. This type of workplace aggression is particularly difficult because, unlike the typical school bully, workplace bullies often operate within the established rules and policies of their organization and their society. In the majority of cases, bullying in the workplace is reported as having been by someone who has authority over their victim. However, bullies can also be peers, and occasionally subordinates. 

Signs of a Possible Workplace Bully Leaders:

  • Demeaning, disrespectful and devaluing employees capabilities
  • Public ridicule, sarcastic, insults, name-calling, threats, and intimidation
  • Targeting and creating social isolation with staff
  • Blaming, lying, gossiping, spreading rumors and whispering
  • Failing to give credit to employees for their work
  • Overloading targeted employee with a huge workload
  • Micro-Manages and commands respect without earning it
  • A know it all

Bully leaders create isolation and silo work environments.  They divide staff and departments to keep control.

Why don’t people speak up?  Employees are afraid of losing their jobs.

Bullying by leadership has been associated with number of physical and behavioral health issues for the employees who are targeted.

Warning Signs of an Employee Being Bullied:

  • Becomes less socially active or confident
  • Appears scared, stressed, anxious or depressed
  • Calling out sick more frequently than normal
  • Physical signs of tension such as headaches, backaches, not sleeping well and suicidal thoughts

If bullying is unaddressed the aggression and unresolved conflicts will continue to escalate.  When not dealt with, it causes negative affects on the targeted workers – maybe even psychological, financial and physical burdens.

The Results to the Employers: 

  • High Turnover and Absenteeism
  • Low Productivity
  • Lack of Creativity
  • Legal Costs
  • Damaged Reputation

If you recognize Workplace Bully Leaders in your organization or within yourself.

Here are a few tips to encourage behavioral change for this type of leadership style.

  • Sit down with them and discuss the behavior you have observe
  • Ask questions, give feedback on their management style and suggestions on how to improve engagement with staff
  • Set a zero tolerance approach of workplace bullying
  • Build trust and open door policies to discuss bullying
  • Schedule leadership training courses especially on bullying – Udemy.com
  • Schedule emotional intelligent courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule interpersonal communication courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule conflict resolution courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule constructive criticism courses – Udemy.com
  • Read John C. Maxwell Relationships 101 book
  • Get them a mentor who is a successful leader
  • Hire a leadership coach to help them succeed
  • Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

Takeaway:

Bullying promotes an atmosphere of fear, vulnerability, anxiousness, and uncertainty.  Awareness is the key to change.  Develop a workplace of zero tolerance accompanied with training, coaching and mentoring to display compassion, empathy, safety and trust.

Have you had a Workplace Bully as a Boss?  

If yes, How did they make you feel?  

How did you overcome it?

Answering these questions above and sharing your experiences may help someone else dealing with a workplace bully.

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

The Hazardous Results of the Inflexible Leader

The Hazardous Results of the Inflexible Leader

Today, I am going to discuss the leadership style of an inflexible boss.  These type of personalities are unapproachable at work and home.  Any type of change is not welcome or encouraged.  Working with this type of leader stifles innovation and creativity while leaving employees feeling resentful and unmotivated.

What is an inflexible leader?

The inflexible boss is arrogant, distant, unreasonable and unapproachable.  They are closed minded to any changes and will not listen to any new ideas, consider different options or new technology.   The inflexible boss promotes fear over staff to ensure they follow their ways of doing things.

Characteristics of this type to leadership style:

  • Punishes for not doing things their way
  • Their way or the highway
  • Don’t listen or open to any suggestions
  • Always right
  • Strictly by the book/procedures
  • Favorite phrase – We’ve always done it this way
  • Never says sorry
  • Lacks empathy
  • Jumps to conclusion before gathering all the facts

If you recognize inflexible leaders in your organization or within yourself.  Here are a few tips to encourage behavioral change in this leadership style.

  • Sit down with them and discuss the behavior you have observed and explain that it is important to be open to new ways this helps the company to succeed
  • Ask questions, give feedback on their management style and suggestions on how to improve engagement with staff
  • Schedule change management courses – Udemy.com or Lynda.com
  • Schedule emotional intelligence courses Udemy.com
  • Schedule leadership training courses – Lynda.com
  • Schedule interpersonal communication courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule conflict resolution courses – Udemy.com
  • Schedule constructive criticism courses – Udemy.com
  • Give them a mentor who is a successful leader
  • Hire a leadership coach to help them succeed like me
  • Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

Takeaway:

A good leader will let employees try new and different ways of doing processes, especially if the current approach isn’t working or becoming mundane.  Listening is essential to know what is working and what is not.  Being approachable and welcoming is the first step to building trust and be able to hear what people are feeling and new ideas.

If yes, How did you feel working for them?

What were the obstacles and how did you deal with it?

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

The Destruction of the Absentee Leader


What is an absentee leader?

An absentee leader is someone in a leadership position who is psychologically absent from their responsibilities as a leader.  They are known as the “silent killers.”

Here are some characteristics of an absentee leader:

  • Psychologically absent from their staff.
  • Take value out of an organization without contributing back.
  • These leaders are laissez-faire (to let people do as they choose)
  • Don’t show up to meetings, unresponsive to emails, gives zero feedback and doesn’t share important information with employees.
  • Seldom engage with staff.

Organizations rarely confront the absentee leaders.  If left unobserved they can halt succession planning, block potential staff from promoting and cause unproductively in the workplace.  Those who report to them may become frustrated which has a negative impact on the employees and the work environment.

Teams with absent supervisors often feel they have no direction, are unrecognized, neglected and overlooked without any clear goals, guidance, and feedback.  Employees don’t develop under an absentee leader.

The Destruction of the Absentee Leader:

  • Degrades the employee’s job satisfaction
  • Leads to job performance uncertainty
  • Employee’s stress levels and talents are drained

As long as the absentee leader has an employee who will pick up the slack this behavior will continue.  The absentee leader enjoys the perks and entitlements of their title but isn’t doing the job.  This type of leadership style is destructive. The hard-working employee’s who are actually doing the work aren’t receiving the support, recognition, or crucial feedback.  The absentee leader accepts credit when things are going right and pushes blame on staff when things are not.

If you recognize an absentee leader in your organization or within yourself. Here are a few tips to encourage behavioral change in this leadership style.

Companies don’t always see the effects of this type of leadership style until the damage has already occurred.

Takeaway:

Recognize the absentee leader within your organization or inside yourself and address the situation.  Employees want a leader who is there for them.  Staff follow a leader who will coach, train, motivate, recognize their accomplishments and help them to succeed.

Have you experienced an absentee leader?  If yes, What was it like?

 

 

 

 

Comments are always welcome and please share this post with your colleagues, friends, and family on your social networks! Sharing is caring.

How about creating Harmony in Your Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com

Bad Leadership Styles Series


In the month of October, I will be writing a series of blog posts about bad leadership styles.  How to spot them and ways to activate positive outcomes for each of these style types to improve communication and to become an overall better leader.

The Absentee Leader
The Ghosting Leader
The Workplace Bully Leader
The Inflexible Leader
The Vampire Leader

My ultimate goal is for Leaders to recognize these types of behavioral styles within themselves and work on becoming more pleasant to be around at work and home.

Come and join me in this Leadership series and engage in the comments about each Leadership Style you have personally experienced and the impact they made on your career and home life. ~ Patti

For more information about Becoming a Better Leader [e-Book] Click here to download your copy.

How about creating Harmony in Your Work and Home Life; click on the link  21- Days Optimal Work/Life Balance Workshop  to learn more.

Want “one to one coaching” with Patti – email me patti@coachingforinspirationwithpatti.com